Home » THE SNIDER-ENFIELD: Brass Conversion and Shooting a Snider Rifle by R. Ted Jeo
THE SNIDER-ENFIELD: Brass Conversion and Shooting a Snider Rifle R. Ted Jeo

THE SNIDER-ENFIELD: Brass Conversion and Shooting a Snider Rifle

R. Ted Jeo

Published January 5th 2011
ISBN :
Kindle Edition
22 pages
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 About the Book 

An excerpt from the article: Not so many years ago, the mention of a Snider rifle would have been greeted by blank stares and confused looks. Even among gun enthusiasts it was relatively unknown. How could a rifle that served the British Empire forMoreAn excerpt from the article: Not so many years ago, the mention of a Snider rifle would have been greeted by blank stares and confused looks. Even among gun enthusiasts it was relatively unknown. How could a rifle that served the British Empire for almost fifty years remain so obscure? Well, this stop gap breach loader was a first line weapon for less than five years, and no collectable numbers of them were imported into the U.S. for decades. The release of the Nepal arms cache has ended those years of obscurity. Snider rifles are once again available and the gun press has written several articles about them. Mention a Snider rifle today and you’ll be greeted with a bit more knowing looks and a discussion comparing its merits and weaknesses to those of the American trapdoor Springfield. Once your Snider arrives, you realize you’ll have to feed the beast. Ammo, if you can find it, costs about five dollars a round. Brass prices range from three to five dollars a round. Reloading will save you some money, but brass forming is where the real savings start. For the cost of a few boxes of commercial ammo you can outfit yourself with all you need to complete the process. This is especially true if you have already outfitted yourself to reload for your Martini Henry rifle (a shameless plug for our other article!)